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Virginia’s Leaders in the Law 2009 | Colleen M. Quinn

Virginia’s Leaders in the Law 2009 | Colleen M. Quinn

 

Virginia Lawyers Weekly

Colleen M. Quinn was honored for leadership in Adoption and Surrogacy, and service to the YWCA.

Click Here to Read this Entire Article as a PDF

New Paths to Parenthood

New Paths to Parenthood

 

As Infertility treatment advances, more Americans are turning to Assisted Reproduction. Here, we take a look at some of the choices families are making.

by

Elizabeth Larsen

Click here to View This article as a PDF

Virginia Super Lawyers 2006

Virginia Super Lawyers 2006

Excellence From The Boardroom To The Courtroom "The firm’s trial practice includes representing plaintiffs in catastrophic injury and death cases in all types of tort actions. Motor vehicle accidents, medical malpractice, traumatic brain injury cases, and pharmaceutical and securities litigation comprise the majority of the firm’s trial cases. Much of the firm’s litigation practice is based on referrals from other lawyers." - From the Article

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Justice with a Busy Woman’s Touch

Justice with a Busy Woman’s Touch

by by Mary A. Tobey

Found in AUGUST 2006 • Vmagazine for Women | Click Here to Download the Article

As a lawyer, Colleen Marea Quinn, Esq. is a superlative representative of Lady Justice, standing straight and tall with strength and dignity, holding the scales of justice in one hand and a sword in the other. Her résumé and her life, however, portray the image not of a woman standing still, Read More

Changes Proposed to Simplify Adoptions

Bills aim to shorten waiting periods, make the process easier BY TAMMIE SMITH TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER Tuesday, February 7, 2006

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An attorney who handles adoptions, Colleen Marea Quinn sometimes has a case where the mother has no idea where the father is. All the mother may know is his first name and where they met. But for adoption to take place, attempts have to Read More

Your Mother Would Know

By Carol Barbieri

November 29, 2005 Op-Ed Contributor | Atlantic Highlands, N.J.

"It's been 14 years, but I can still feel the terror that gripped me when our son's cardiologist asked my husband and me if Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome ran in our family. Getting my husband's family medical history was as simple as calling his mother. But I'm adopted: I didn't know who in my family may have had this heart condition, and Read More

8 Myths and Realities About Adoption

8 Myths and Realities About Adoption

Click Here to View the Entire Document As a PDF

MYTH There are very few babies being placed for adoption in the U.S. REALITY 20,000 or more U.S.-born infants are placed for adoption each year—more than the number of international adoptions yearly.

MYTH Adoption is outrageously expensive, out of reach for most families. REALITY Adoption is often no more expensive than giving birth. Costs to adopt domestically average

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Birthmother Choices and Adoptive Parent Issues2004 Adoptive Families Magazine

Dont' Expect to Recover Money Spent on Birthmother Living Expenses by Colleen M. Quinn

From 2004 Adoptive Families Magazine

"Q: If a prospective birthmother decides not place her baby with us for adoption, can we get back the money we paid for her living expenses during the pregnancy?

A: The expenses that prospective parents can pay in connection with an adoption are regulated by state law, and vary from

Read More

How to Be an Adoption Advocate

Road-Tested Tips for Families By Katherine Mikkelson

from Adoptive Families Magazine, July/August 2003

"As an attorney, I used to advocate for my clients. But when I left work at the end of the day, my cases and my lawyering skills stayed at the office. A few years ago, however—about the time Zack, my oldest, entered preschool—I noticed that my professional skills had crossed over into my dealings with friends,

Read More

Wrongful Adoption: What It Is, What It Is Not

After we adopted our daughter, we discovered that she had significant medical problems. We think our adoption agency was aware of this but didn’t tell us. Is there anything we can do? By Sam Totaro

From 2003 Adoptive Families Magazine.

"In the vast majority of cases, adopted children do not have any significant impairment, and adjust well. But occasionally placements turn out to be disastrous. In some of those

Read More

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Virginia’s Leaders in the Law 2009 | Colleen M. Quinn


Virginia's Leaders in the Law 2009 | Colleen M. Quinn

 

Virginia Lawyers Weekly

Colleen M. Quinn was honored for leadership in Adoption and Surrogacy, and service to the YWCA.

Click Here to Read this Entire Article as a PDF

New Paths to Parenthood


Adoptive Families - New Paths to Parenthood

 

As Infertility treatment advances, more Americans are turning to Assisted Reproduction. Here, we take a look at some of the choices families are making.

by

Elizabeth Larsen

Click here to View This article as a PDF

Virginia Super Lawyers 2006


Colleen M. Quinn | Super Lawyers 2006

Excellence From The Boardroom To The Courtroom

“The firm’s trial practice includes representing plaintiffs in catastrophic injury and death cases in all types of tort actions. Motor vehicle accidents, medical malpractice, traumatic brain injury cases, and pharmaceutical and securities litigation comprise the majority of the firm’s trial cases. Much of the firm’s litigation practice is based on referrals from other lawyers.” – From the Article

Click Here to View the Full Article as a PDF

Justice with a Busy Woman’s Touch


Justice with a Busy Woman's touch

by

by Mary A. Tobey

Found in AUGUST 2006 • Vmagazine for Women | Click Here to Download the Article

As a lawyer, Colleen Marea Quinn, Esq. is a superlative representative of Lady Justice, standing straight and tall with strength and dignity, holding the scales of justice in one hand and a sword in the other. Her résumé and her life, however, portray the image not of a woman standing still, but of a woman of action. As a trial lawyer at Cantor Arkema, P.C., where she is also director and equity owner, Colleen works tirelessly to keep the scales of justice in balance. She represents clients in all aspects of personal injury, including motor vehicle accidents, product liability cases, assaults and batteries, and sexual assault.

Colleen is proud of her profession, and touts the impact that trial lawyers have in making our nation a safer place to live. “Unfortunately,” she says, “the public doesn’t hear about all the good work being done—and all the wrongs or injustices that are being set right—by trial lawyers. The best and most egregious cases typically settle under confidentiality provisions, so the public doesn’t usually hear about the meritorious cases; they only hear about the frivolous or outrageous ones.”

In addition to her successes in individual cases, Colleen has achieved success within the legal profession. She received the distinction of being a “Super Lawyer,” is “av” rated in ability and ethics by Martindale Hubbell, and was elected to the “Legal Elite” in 2005 by Richmond Business magazine. She is a frequent speaker, and involved in numerous bar and professional activities. In addition to her passion as a trial lawyer, she also practices adoption law, helping to connect eager parents and their new adopted children.

Another part of Colleen’s work at Cantor Arkema is the Women’s Injury Law Center (WILC), through which she provides representation for clients who can benefit specifically from female representation, including issues of special interest to women. “I created the Women’s Injury Law Center,” Colleen explains, “because I saw a need out there for women (including moms and their children) to receive legal representation by other women and moms…. We understand the things that are important to women and their self-esteem.”

All of that is not enough for this impassioned professional woman. She also wants to be proactive to prevent problems for women. “My partner Stephanie [Grana] and I also feel that it is the mission of WILC to ‘inform, educate and empower women to protect themselves and their loved ones from injury.’” To achieve that goal, they present programs that educate women on issues such as avoiding sexual assaults, purchasing adequate auto insurance, and ensuring the safety of their children through helmets, proper car seats, and so on.

That still isn’t enough. Colleen is also active in community service, as a single parent of twin boys, and as fitness enthusiast—she is aerobics instructor, scuba diver, and soccer coach, among other pursuits. Civic activities include the YWCA, Leadership Metro Richmond, and Destination Imagination. Colleen

received the “Top Forty under 40” award from Inside Business in 1999 for her civic involvement and professional achievements.
The serenity of this lady lawyer, who could easily pose for the statue of Lady Justice, seems to belie the active life she lives. Perhaps that’s because Colleen Quinn believes so deeply in her work. The most gratifying part of her job, she says, is “knowing that I made a difference in the lives of others.” V

Found in AUGUST 2006 • Vmagazine for Women | Click Here to Download the Article

Changes Proposed to Simplify Adoptions


Bills aim to shorten waiting periods, make the process easier
BY TAMMIE SMITH
TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER
Tuesday, February 7, 2006

Click Here to View This Article as a PDF

An attorney who handles adoptions, Colleen Marea Quinn sometimes has a case where the mother has no idea where the father is.

All the mother may know is his first name and where they met.

But for adoption to take place, attempts have to be made to find him and give him time to object. “If we don’t know where he is but have a name, we can do an order of publication in a newspaper, which has to run for four weeks,” Quinn said.

They also try searching computer databases and occasionally hire a private investigator.

“The adopting parents pay for that ultimately,” said Quinn, who is with the firm Cantor Arkema P.C.

That requirement and others slow down the adoption process.

To streamline the adoption process, Virginia legislators are considering a number of bills recommended by a study group that spent several months last year looking at Virginia adoption law.

As of December, there were 1,655 children in Virginia who social-services officials hoped would find adoptive homes. Of that number, 889 were legally free to be adopted.

Some of the proposed bills simply “clean up” the adoption statutes in the state code, for instance, putting them in one section rather than scattered throughout.

Other changes calls for more substantial changes in policy.

For instance, to deal with the issue of men who can’t be found, a putative-father registry would be created. The registry would put the onus on men who might be the fathers to notify the state of their whereabouts. Men who register would be notified if a child they may have fathered is put up for adoption.

A putative father is a man who is generally believed to be a child’s father but has not been legally determined to be so.

In some places, such registries are part of laws called the National Proud Father Act because they allow men to actively take responsibility for children they father.

“We have had cases where the birth mother moved to another state to try to avoid the birth father being part of the process,” Quinn said.

“Most birth moms are honest. But we also have the issue of a birth mom signing an affidavit of unknown paternity saying ‘I don’t know who he is,’ but she really does know. She just does not want for him to be part of the process.” On the other side, putative father registries make it easier to terminate the right of the birth father if he is not registered, Quinn said.

Some other proposals:

– Shorten some waiting times. For instance, the time a birth mother has to change her mind after consenting to the adoption would change to a total of 10 days. Currently, a woman cannot legally consent to give up a child for adoption until the baby is at least 10 days old, and then she has 15 days to change her mind, so there are at least 25 days before consent is irrevocable. Create a mutual-consent registry, which would allow birth parents, adoptees who have reached 21 and siblings to register and be notified if any are seeking information about any other.

– Clear up provisions dealing with abandoned children for whom neither parent is available to grant consent for adoption.

– Allow birth fathers to consent to adoption prior to a child’s birth but still give them 10 days after the child is born to revoke that consent.

– Create a hybrid type of adoption that allows women to place their children with an adoption agency and chose the adopting family but keep some aspects of their lives private. Now, women who want to select a family to do the adopting have to do parental placement adoptions, which are open adoptions in which both sides know who the other is.

“What we are trying to do is have a code that . . . encourages people to adopt more children,” said Vickie Johnson-Scott, director of the Division of Family Services at the state Department of Social Services. “We want every child to have a home and a loving family.”

In fiscal year 2005 in Virginia, the state Department of Social Services recorded 540 public adoptions and 72 private adoptions.

State social-services figures show the average time a child is in foster care waiting for an adoptive home is 37.8 months.

That time varies with the age of the child.

Contact staff writer Tammie Smith at tlsmith@timesdispatch.com or (804) 649-6572.
This story can be found at:
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD/MGArticle/RTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1137833915651

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Your Mother Would Know


By Carol Barbieri

November 29, 2005
Op-Ed Contributor | Atlantic Highlands, N.J.

“It’s been 14 years, but I can still feel the terror that gripped me when our son’s cardiologist asked my husband and me if Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome ran in our family.

Getting my husband’s family medical history was as simple as calling his mother. But I’m adopted: I didn’t know who in my family may have had this heart condition, and it wouldn’t be easy to find out.

And yet, my medical history was crucial to treating our son. If the syndrome did not run in my family, the doctor counseled that my son would run an elevated risk of sudden death, and she’d be inclined to perform the corrective operation right away. But its rate of success at the time was just 50 percent. She was hoping she could postpone the operation for a few years until surgeons grew better at the procedure. The difference could mean life or death.” – From the Article

Click Here to View the Full Article as a PDF

8 Myths and Realities About Adoption


8 Myths and Realities About Adoption

Click Here to View the Entire Document As a PDF

MYTH There are very few babies being placed for adoption in the U.S.
REALITY 20,000 or more U.S.-born infants are placed for adoption each year—more than the number of international adoptions yearly.

MYTH Adoption is outrageously expensive, out of reach for most families.
REALITY Adoption is often no more expensive than giving birth. Costs to adopt domestically average $15,000, before the $10,000 Adoption Tax Credit and benefits that many employers offer.

MYTH It takes years to complete an adoption.
REALITY The average time span of adoption is one to two years. The majority of domestic and international
adopters who responded to a recent poll by Adoptive Families Magazine completed their adoptions in less than a year.

MYTH Birthparents can show up at any time to reclaim their child.
REALITY Once an adoption is finalized, the adoptive family is recognized as the child’s family by law. Despite the publicity surrounding a few high-profile cases, post-adoption revocations are extremely rare.

MYTH Birthparents are all troubled teens.
REALITY Most birthparents today are over 18, but lack the resources to care for a child. It is generally with courage and love for their child that they terminate their parental rights.

MYTH Adopted children are more likely to be troubled than birth children.
REALITY Research shows that adoptees are as well-adjusted as their non-adopted peers. There is virtually no difference in psychological functioning between them.

MYTH Open adoption causes problems for children.
REALITY Adoptees are not confused by contact with their birthparents. They benefit from the increased understanding that their birthparents gave them life but their forever families take care of and nurture them.

MYTH Parents can’t love an adopted child as much as they would a biological child.

REALITY Love and attachment are not the result of nor guaranteed by biology. The intensity of bonding and depth of emotion are the same, regardless of how the child joined the family.

Click Here to View the Entire Document As a PDF

Copyright ©2004 Adoptive Families Magazine; permission is granted to
reproduce this page for educational, not-for-profit purposes. For more
information, visit Adoptive Families online: http://www.adoptivefamilies.com.
To subscribe to Adoptive Families Magazine, call 800-372-3300.

Birthmother Choices and Adoptive Parent Issues2004 Adoptive Families Magazine


Dont’ Expect to Recover Money Spent on Birthmother Living Expenses

by Colleen M. Quinn

From 2004 Adoptive Families Magazine

Q: If a prospective birthmother decides not place her baby with us for adoption, can we get back the money we paid for her living expenses during the pregnancy?

A: The expenses that prospective parents can pay in connection with an adoption are regulated by state law,
and vary from state to state. (See a summary of state law concerning payment of birth mother expenses at: http://www.adoptivefamilies.com adoptionlaws .) In most states, adoptive parents can pay a birth family’s reasonable medical, legal, and counseling expenses. Many also permit some assistance with living expenses (usually within specific guidelines).” – From the Article

Click Here to View the Full Article as a PDF

How to Be an Adoption Advocate


Road-Tested Tips for Families

By Katherine Mikkelson

from Adoptive Families Magazine, July/August 2003

“As an attorney, I used to advocate for my clients. But when I left work at the end of the day, my cases and my lawyering skills stayed at the office. A few years ago, however—about the time Zack, my oldest, entered preschool—I noticed that my professional skills had crossed over into my dealings with friends, neighbors, and others in the community. I was becoming an adoption advocate. You don’t have to be an adoption professional to take on this role. Every time you educate or enlighten someone, you are advocating adoption.” – From the Article – Click below to read more!

Click here to View the Full Article as a PDF

Wrongful Adoption: What It Is, What It Is Not


After we adopted our daughter, we discovered that she had significant medical problems. We think our adoption agency was aware of this but didn’t tell us. Is there anything we can do?

By Sam Totaro

From 2003 Adoptive Families Magazine.

“In the vast majority of cases, adopted children do not have any significant impairment, and adjust well. But occasionally placements turn out to be disastrous. In some of those cases, adoption agencies or professionals, either intentionally or negligently, failed to make a good faith effort to identify all of the medical and/or social background information available regarding the adopted child and his or her birth family, and then to divulge that information to prospective adoptive parents. The courts have started to address these issues by allowing lawsuits, commonly referred to as ‘wrongful adoption.’ ” – From the Article

Click Here to View the Full Article as a PDF

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